US CHINA TRADE WAR–TRUMP AND TRADE, TRADE DROP, TAA FOR COMPANIES THE ANSWER, EC NME PROBLEM, UNIVERSAL TRADE WAR, CUSTOMS AND 337

White House Fountain Snow Pennsylvania Ave Washington DCTRADE IS A TWO WAY STREET

“PROTECTIONISM BECOMES DESTRUCTIONISM; IT COSTS JOBS”

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN, JUNE 28, 1986

US CHINA TRADE WAR NOVEMBER 14, 2016

Dear Friends,

This blog post contains several articles about trade and Trump after his victory on November 8th.  The Trump victory will have a significant impact on trade policy.  As stated below, the TPP is dead.  The Republican Congress will not oppose Trump and bring the TPP to the Congressional floor in the Lame Duck.  The TPP may only come back when and if the trade safety net, including Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms/Companies, is fixed.

The trade impact on the Rust Belt states, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Ohio, is a major reason for the Trump victory.  Trump’s victory means that trade wars may escalate.  But with the increase in trade wars, global trade has already started falling and that means a 2015 drop of $200 billion in US exports.  Exports create US jobs too and when exports fall US jobs fall.

As Congressman Don Bonker states, trade conflicts with China and other countries will increase both from the US and the Chinese side. Trump may well self-initiate trade cases against China and China will bring cases against the US.  But Congressional Republicans will try to limit Trump’s protectionist nature.

Xi Jinping of China has already stated that the Chinese government wants to work with President Trump because of the importance of the US China economic relationship.

Complicating the situation is that last week the EC has proposed a change to its antidumping and countervailing to allow it to continue to treat China as a nonmarket economy country or as a country which distorts its market by government practices.

On the other hand, we can expect Congress to work very close with President Trump on different policy initiatives to make the United States a much more fertile ground for US manufacturing.  This will mean cuts in Corporate tax rates and the reduction in production curtailing regulations.  Trump will try and do everything possible to increase jobs in the United States.  Hopefully, that will mean more support to Trade Adjustment Assistance for Companies, which is the only effective US trade remedy that saves companies and the jobs that go with them.

Under the Universal Trade War theme, there are articles by Chinese lawyers on Chinese antidumping law, along with newsletter from an Indian lawyer about Indian trade law.  Many of these cases in other countries target the United States.

In addition, there is an article about Customs Evasion in the Aluminum Extrusions antidumping case and several recent 337 intellectual property cases against China.

If anyone has any questions or wants additional information, please feel free to contact me at my e-mail address bill@harrismoure.com.

Best regards,

Bill Perry

TRADE AND TRADE POLICY

TRUMP VICTORY AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR TRADE

Donald Trump won the Presidency on November 8th, and on January 20, 2017 Trump will become the 45th President of the United States.  What does this mean for trade?

TPP IS DEAD

With the Trump victory, Republicans in the House and the Senate will not fight Trump and will not bring the Trans Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) to the floor during the Lame Duck session. According to recent press reports, Trump might try and renegotiate TPP, but as written, TPP  is dead.

Several weeks ago during the heat of the campaign, Paul Ryan, Speaker of the House of Representatives, stated that he could no longer campaign with Donald Trump.  ln a speech on November 9th, the day after the Trump victory, House Speaker Paul Ryan ate humble pie.

In his speech, Ryan made it very clear that Trump’s victory was the most “incredible political feat” of his lifetime.  For a video of Paul Ryan’s speech, see https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=paul+ryan+speech+video+after+trump+victory&view=detail&mid=556B672FB48D720BC373556B672FB48D720BC373&FORM=VIRE

Ryan also made it clear that he was extremely grateful because Trump was the first time Republican Presidential candidate to win Wisconsin’s electoral votes, his home state, since 1984.  Ryan also stated that Trump had coat tails.  Trump’s victory allowed down ballet Republicans to win.  The most important example of that was Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson, who was in a very tough reelection campaign.  Trump’s victory helped Ron Jonson win and allowed the Republicans to hold on to the Senate by a 51 to 49 plurality.

The simple political reality is that Trump’s victory allowed the Republicans to hold a majority in the Senate and the House.

As Paul Ryan stated,

“Donald Trump heard a voice in this country that no one else heard.  He connected in ways with people that no one else did.  He turned politics on its head.  And now Donald Trump will lead a unified Republican government.”

There is no way that Paul Ryan is going to oppose Trump and bring the TPP to the floor of Congress in the face of that political feat.  Let the next Administration deal with this issue.  As explained below, the TPP will probably stay dead until Congress and the Administration fix the Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms/Companies program and make many US companies competitive again so they can withstand competition from imports.

It should be noted that those Republicans that distanced themselves from Trump, such as Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire, lost their races.  In light of the Trump victory and his opposition to Trump, Governor John Kasich will have little weight when he argues for the TPP.

TRUMP’S PROTECTIONIST ARGUMENT TO THE RUST BELT STATES DROVE HIS VICTORY

The big surprise in the Trump victory was that traditionally Democratic states, the Rust Belt, of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania and Ohio all went for Trump.  To illustrate the shock to the Democratic party, Hilary Clinton did not even campaign in the State of Wisconsin because the Democrats assumed they had Wisconsin in the bag.  Why did these Rust Belt states go for Trump?  Trade.

The person who forecast this victory was Michael Moore, the very famous Democratic gadfly and movie producer.  In a true statement against interest, last summer Michael Moore explained why he, the Good Democrat, believed that Trump would win the election—the Rust Belt and Trade.  http://michaelmoore.com/trumpwillwin/.  Donald Trump spoke out against the US automobile companies moving their manufacturing to Mexico.  Trump threatened that if they did, a President Trump would impose a 35% tariff on all these cars coming back to the United States.  The Auto executives were stunned, but the Working Class in Michigan stood up and cheered.  See Moore’s powerful video predicting the Trump victory https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKeYbEOSqYc.  As Moore stated, Donald Trump is the “human Molotov cocktail” that these working people want to throw through the establishment window.

After the election, Moore also made it clear that it was not racism that allowed Trump to win.  As Moore stated, millions of Americans, who voted for Barak Hussein Obama for two terms, voted for Donald Trump.  See Moore’s video at http://dailycaller.com/2016/11/11/michael-moore-millions-of-trump-voters-elected-obama-twice-theyre-not-racist-video/.  To paraphrase Bill Clinton, the reason Trump won was “the economy stupid” and one of the major economic issues was trade.

Ohio’s Cuyahoga County Republican Party Chairman Robert S. Frost stated that he believes that Trump’s trade message had a deep and profound effect on the regional electorate in Ohio:

“The economy has been going gangbusters, the U.S. has been expanding its trade relationships … but there are people here who [were] working, at many times, very skilled jobs that they took a great deal of pride in. They felt like they were left behind in this economy, and Donald Trump spoke right to that in places like Youngstown to Detroit to Milwaukee.”

Exit polls showed that half of Michigan’s voters are of the opinion that free trade takes away jobs, and those trade skeptics broke for Trump by a 57 to 36 percent margin over Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.  There are similar stories to be found in Ohio and Pennsylvania, where 47 percent and 53 percent of voters respectively felt that free trade hurts workers and jobs.

Trump’s arguments are the same protectionist arguments that Rust Belt Democrats have used to be elected for decades, but the Workers had seen no change.  By upending conventional Republican wisdom on trade, Trump opened the door to a whole new group of voters.  These workers in the Rust Belt are Nixon’s Silent Majority, the Reagan Democrats, that went for Trump.

As Frost further stated:

“Organized labor had thought that the Democrats had had their backs for the last 25 years, but they look around and see where they are, and they wonder why they had placed their faith there. Donald Trump went against what had been Republican orthodoxy on trade. Part of how we got there is that Hillary Clinton … began taking an internationalist position of trade for trade’s sake, as opposed to representing an American position on trade.”

Trump appealed to the emotions of workers who felt wronged by a steady pattern of trade liberalization that is, in their minds, was about to get much worse if the U.S. Congress had been able to ratify the Trans-Pacific Partnership accord,

On October 18, 2016 in an article in Real Clear Politics entitled “The Trump Trade Doctrine: A Path to Growth & Budget Balance”. Wilbur Ross & Peter Navarro explained why they believed the Trump Trade Policy would work:

Budget-deficit hawks often insist that the only way to balance the Federal budget is to raise taxes or cut spending. The far smarter path to balance the budget is simply to grow our economy faster.

From 1947 to 2001, the U.S. real gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 3.5 percent. Since 2002, that rate has fallen to 1.9 percent — at the cost of millions of jobs and trillions of dollars of additional income and tax revenues.

Donald Trump’s economic plan will restore America’s real GDP growth rate to its historic norm.  It proposes tax cuts, reduced regulation, lower energy costs, and eliminating America’s chronic trade deficit. . . .

This new normal argument — it should more appropriately be called the “new dismal” — also ignores the self-inflicted negative impacts from poorly negotiated trade deals and the failure to enforce them. These bad deals include, most notably, NAFTA, China’s entry into the World Trade Organization in 2001, and, most recently, Hillary Clinton’s debilitating 2012 U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement.

In 2012, then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton promised that the “cutting edge” South Korean deal would create 70,000 new jobs. Instead, the US has lost 95,000 jobs and America’s trade deficit with South Korea has roughly doubled. Moreover, workers in the U.S. auto industry, particularly in states such as Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana, have been hard hit. . . .

Donald Trump has pledged to renegotiate every one of America’s bad trade deals according to the principles of the Trump Trade Doctrine. The Trump Trade Doctrine states that any new or renegotiated deal must increase the GDP growth rate, decrease the trade deficit, and strengthen the U.S. manufacturing base. . . .

Some critics will argue that reducing the flow of cheap imports from locales such as China, Mexico, and Vietnam will be inflationary and act as a regressive tax by denying lower-income households cheap imports. In reality, four decades of one-sided globalization and chronic trade deficits have shifted wealth and capital from workers to the mobile owners of capital and reduced the purchasing power of Americans.

A visit to cities like Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and Flint, Michigan, reveals quickly the falsehoods and broken promises of those who preach the gains from trade deficits — which are often financed by those who turn a profit from offshoring production. Trump’s proposals will reverse these trends, concentrate more wealth and purchasing power in the hands of domestic workers and result in substantially higher employment. This will more than offset any price increases. Moreover, as products develop a competitive advantage in America and increase their production and margins, prices per unit will go down.

To those alarmists who insist Trump’s trade policies will ignite a trade war, we say we are already engaged in a trade war — a war in which the American government has surrendered in before even engaging. Unfair trade practices and policies of our competitors are simply overlooked or ignored. As a well-documented result, America has already lost tens of thousands of factories, millions of jobs, and trillions in wages and tax revenues.

Donald Trump will simply put our government on the field in defense of American interests. As Trump pursues a policy of more balanced trade, our major trading partners are far more likely to cooperate with an America resolute about balancing its trade than they are likely to provoke a trade war.

This is true for one very simple reason: Our major trading partners and deficit counterparties are far more dependent on our markets — the largest in the world — than we are on their markets.

Consider that in 2015, we ran a trade deficit in goods of $746 billion. 76 percent of that trade deficit in goods concerned just four countries: China ($367 billion); Germany ($75 billion); Japan ($69 billion); and Mexico ($61 billion).

If we look at the bilateral relationships of America with each of these countries, improvement in our trade balance is clearly achievable through some combination of increased exports and reduced imports, albeit after some tough, smart negotiations — an obvious Trump strength.   The same possibilities exist with countries where we are running smaller, but nonetheless significant, deficits, such as Vietnam ($31 billion), South Korea ($28 billion), Italy ($28 billion), and India ($23 billion).

Such deficit reduction negotiations will not be wild-eyed, hip-shooting exercises. A key part of the Trump strategy will be to divert some of the products our deficit counterparties import to U.S. suppliers.

For example, many of our trading partners with which we run large trade deficits import substantial hydrocarbons from elsewhere. It would not be difficult for, say, China, Japan, Germany, and South Korea to buy more U.S. hydrocarbons. Trump intends to end the regulatory constraints on hydrocarbon production and hydrocarbon exports, resulting in as much as $95 billion gains for the U.S.

Our deficit counterparties also import lots of industrial equipment and supplies of plastics and other materials, some from the U.S. already. There is ample room here for them — along with countries like India, Mexico, and Vietnam — to switch vendors.

Trump’s strategic approach to trade negotiations would begin with product-by-product and country-by-country analyses. Our negotiators would set goals that are achievable and pursue them fiercely. No prior administration has ever approached trade as surgically as a Trump Administration would.

As a business person, rather than a politician, Trump understands this: There is no more reason to let our major trading partners take advantage of us than there is for a large private company to permit its vendors to do so.

You will notice we have not mentioned tariffs. They will be used if necessary against mercantilist cheating, but only in a very precise and defensive way.

Ultimately, our view is that doing nothing about unfair trade practices is the most hazardous course of action — and the results of this hazard are lived out every day by millions of displaced American workers and deteriorating communities. We simply cannot trade on their one-sided terms; they are just too destructive to the U.S. growth process.

At the end of the day — and on November 8th — voters have a very clear choice between Trump’s smart path to rapid growth and budget balance and Hillary Clinton’s new dismal world of economic stagnation. At least on the economy, this choice is clear.

Emphasis added.

The problem with the argument, however, is that it is based on the economic situation decades ago when the US was the largest market in the World.  That is no longer true.  China with its 1.2 billion population has a larger market than the US.  House Speaker Paul Ryan has cited many times that 75% of the World’s consumers are outside the United States.

The real problem with Trump’s trade policy is uncertainty.  No one knows how aggressive Trump will be in a new Administration.  Through the Commerce Department self-initiating antidumping and countervailing duty cases and bringing Section 201 Escape Clause cases against the World, a President Trump can certainly increase protectionist barriers in the US.

A President Trump can unravel NAFTA and dump the TPP, but if the US erects substantial barriers to US imports, countries around the World will respond by increasing barriers to US exports.

NOT RETALIATION RECIPROCITY

The problem with protectionism is that trade is a two-way street and what the US can do to countries, they can do back.  In my last blog post, I stated that although many US politicians, including Donald Trump, want to adopt a mercantilist trade policy which favors pushing exports and protecting US industries from imports, the US politicians simply do not understand retaliation.  In this blog post, I want to restate this because the issue is not retaliation.  It is reciprocity.

Retaliation implies a tit for tat response.  You attack us.  We attack you.  The United States files an antidumping case targeting $4 billion in imports of Solar Cells from China, and China responds with a meritless Chinese antidumping case targeting $2 billion in imports of Polysilicon from the United States.  But that is not what truly happened.  In the Chinese polysilicon case, for example, the Chinese polysilicon industry was truly being hurt by US imports.

The real issue is reciprocity.  If the US can use its antidumping and countervailing duty laws to find dumping and subsidization in more than 90% of the cases, the Chinese governments and governments around the World can make the same finding with regards to imports from the United States.  What goes around comes around.

Free trade agreements, such as the TPP and the TTIP, which would break this cycle are now dead as the US and each country wants to put its industries first and make their country and industries great again.  The rise in economic nationalism results in trade wars in which country after country will fire trade guns against each other.

The argument that trade wars are already going on is true, but what the pundits do not realize is that under Trump the trade wars will get bigger.  The US has antidumping and countervailing duty orders covering $30 billion in imports from China.  The Chinese government has orders blocking about $10 billion in imports from the US, including polysilicon, chicken, numerous chemical products, and steel products.  Just recently, the Chinese government has issued an antidumping order blocking over $1 billion in Chinese imports from the United States of distiller grains, and now there is talk about a case targeting $15 billion of imports of US soybeans.  What goes around comes around.

In a November 11th editorial, entitled “The Message Of Donald Trump’s Stunning Victory” the International Business Daily stated that the one policy which has to be reined in by Republicans in Congress is trade:

“Republicans will also have to work hard to temper Trump’s anti-free-trade instincts.  A trade war is the one big risk Trump’s presidency represents for the economy.  Trump has repeatedly the he is all in favor of free trade, and the GOP needs to hold him to those words.”

TRADE IS FALLING AROUND THE WORLD

Moreover, on October 30, 2016, Binyamin Applebaum in an article entitledA Little-Noticed Fact About Trade: It’s No Longer Rising” found that trade around the world is dropping, including a drop of $200 billion in US exports:

“The growth of trade among nations is among the most consequential and controversial economic developments of recent decades. Yet despite the noisy debates, which have reached new heights during this Presidential campaign, it is a little-noticed fact that trade is no longer rising. The volume of global trade was flat in the first quarter of 2016, then fell by 0.8 percent in the second quarter, according to statisticians in the Netherlands, which happens to keep the best data.

The United States is no exception to the broader trend. The total value of American imports and exports fell by more than $200 billion last year. Through the first nine months of 2016, trade fell by an additional $470 billion It is the first time since World War II that trade with other nations has declined during a period of economic growth. . ..

But there are also signs that the slowdown is becoming structural.  Developed nations appear to be backing away from globalization.

The World Trade Organization’s most recent round of global trade talks ended in failure last year. The Trans-Pacific Partnership, an attempt to forge a regional agreement among Pacific Rim nations, also is foundering. It is opposed by both major-party American presidential candidates. Meanwhile, new barriers are rising. Britain is leaving the European Union. The World Trade Organization said in July that its members had put in place more than 2,100 new restrictions on trade since 2008.

“Curbing free trade would be stalling an engine that has brought unprecedented welfare gains around the world over many decades,” Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, wrote in a recent call for nations to renew their commitment to trade. . . .

But even if growth rebounds, automation reduces the incentives to invest in the low- labor-cost developing world, and it reduces the benefits of such investments for the residents of developing countries.”

UNFAIR TRADE CASES DO NOT WORK; THEY DO NOT SAVE THE US COMPANIES

The problem with the potential Trump policy of bringing more unfair trade cases to solve the trade problem is that trade cases do not work.  They do not save the companies and the jobs that go with them.

Bethlehem Steel, a history that I am personally aware of, had 40 years of protection from steel imports through various antidumping and countervailing duty cases and orders.  Where is Bethlehem Steel today? Green fields.

Trying to stop a wave of low priced imports by filing an unfair trade cases is like putting finger in a dike when faced with a tidal wave engulfing the entire company and industry.

When an industry and company is faced with competition from imports it is so easy to engage in globalization/international trade victimhood.  We poor US companies cannot compete because all imports are dumped and subsidized.

For countries and companies faced with import competition, the easy solution is blame the foreigner.  The only way for a company to truly survive, however, is give up the globalization victimhood mindset and do what is necessary to make the company competitive again.

EXISTING PROGRAMS TO MAKE US MANUFACTURING COMPANIES MORE COMPETITIVE IS THE ANSWER TO THE TRADE PROBLEM — TAA FOR FIRMS/COMPANIES AND THE MEP MANUFACTURING PROGRAM– BUT THEY HAVE BEEN CUT TO THE BONE

As described in my September newsletter and uschinatradewar.com blog post, which can be found at http://uschinatradewar.com/us-china-trade-war-tpp-politics-taaf-the-answer-2-billion-missing-dumping-duties-as-cases-rise-customs-law-changes-solar-cells-337-customs-stop-infringing-imports/, free trade requires competitive US companies and industries.  For the US government to go forward with a free trade agenda and the passage of free trade agreements, it must restore the trade safety net.

The US Government already has successful programs to make US companies injured by imports competitive again, but they have been cut to the bone. Companies and Unions that want to take advantage of these programs and survive must first change their mindset and reject the defeatism of international trade/globalization victimhood.

Those programs are:

  • Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms (Commerce)
  • The Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (Commerce)

Economists and policy makers of all persuasions are now beginning to recognize the requirement for a robust response by this nation to foreign imports – irrespective of party affiliation or the particular free trade agreement under consideration at any given moment.  Companies, workers and Government officials need to stop blaming the foreigner and figure out what they can do to compete with the foreign imports. These two programs make US companies injured by imports competitive again.

Free trade does not have to be abandoned resulting in a lose lose situation for all countries.  When the US Government enters into Trade Agreements, such as NAFTA, the TPP, or the TTIP, Government action changes the market place.  All of a sudden US companies can be faced with a series of flash floods of foreign competition and imports that can simply wipe out US companies.  The US Government must restore the international trade safety net.

A starting point for a trade adjustment strategy would be for a combined Commerce-Labor approach building upon existing authorities and proven programs, that can be upgraded and executed forthwith.

Commerce’s Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms (TAAF) has 11 regional (multi-state) TAAF Centers but the program has been cut to only $12.5 million annually. The system has the band-width to increase to a run rate of $50 million.  Projecting a four-year ramp up of $90 million (FY18-FY21), the TAA program could serve an additional 2,150 companies.

Foreign competitors may argue that TAA for Firms/Companies is a subsidy, but the money does not go directly to the companies themselves, but to consultants to work with the companies through a series of knowledge-based projects to make the companies competitive again.  Moreover, the program does not affect the US market or block imports in any way.

Does the program work?  In the Northwest, where I am located, the Northwest Trade Adjustment Assistance Center has been able to save 80% of the companies that entered the program since 1984.  The Mid Atlantic Trade Adjustment Assistance Center in this video at http://mataac.org/howitworks/ describes in detail how the program works and saved four companies and the jobs that go with them.  The reason TAA for Firms/Companies is so successful—Its flexibility in working with companies on an individual basis to come up with a specific adjustment plan for each company to make the companies competitive again in the US market as it exists today.

Increasing funding will allow the TAA for Firms/Companies program to expand its bandwidth and provide relief to larger US companies, including possibly even steel producers.  If companies that use steel can be saved by the program, why can’t the steel producers themselves?

But it will take a tough love approach to trade problems.  Working with the companies’ management and the Union to forget about Globalization victimhood and start trying to actually solve the Company’s problems that hinder its competitiveness in the market as it exists today.

In addition to TAA for Firms/Companies, another important remedy needed to increase competitiveness is Commerce’s Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP), which has a Center in each State and Puerto Rico.  MEP provides high quality management and technical assistance to the country’s small manufacturers with an annual budget of $130 million. MEP, in fact, is one the remedies suggested by the TAA Centers along with other projects to make the companies competitive again.

As a consequence of a nation-wide re-invention of the system, MEP is positioned to serve even more companies. A commitment of $100 million over four years would serve an additional 8,400 firms. These funds could be targeted to the small manufacturing firms that are the base of our supply chain threatened by foreign imports.

Each of these programs requires significant non-federal match or cost share from the companies themselves, to assure that the local participants have significant skin in the game and to amplify taxpayer investment.  A $250 million commitment from the U.S. government would be a tangible although modest first step in visibly addressing the local consequences of our trade policies. The Department of Commerce would operate these programs in a coordinated fashion, working in collaboration with the Department of Labor’s existing Trade Adjustment Assistance for Displaced Workers program.

TAA for Workers is funded at the $711 million level, but retraining workers should be the last remedy in the US government’s bag.  If all else fails, retrain workers, but before that retrain the company so that the jobs and the companies are saved.  That is what TAA for Firms/Companies and the MEP program do.  Teach companies how to swim in the new market currents created by trade agreements and the US government

In short – this serious and multi-pronged approach will begin the process of stopping globalization victimhood in its tracks.

Attached is a longer proposal, taaf-2-0-white-paper, on how to expand TAA for Firms/Companies and the MEP Program to make US companies more competitive again.

UNDER TRUMP TRADE CONFLICTS WITH CHINA WILL INCREASE

As readers may remember, my deep dive on the background of this election started with a February conversation and bet with my friend, former Democratic Congressman Don Bonker.  He firmly believed that Hilary Clinton would win in a landslide and the Democrats would win the Senate and the House.

I knew people that were going to vote for Trump and believed that although Clinton would probably win, it would be a close election and the Republicans would probably keep the Senate and definitely the House.  Trump won the election and the Republicans kept the Senate and the House.

Set forth below are Congressman Bonker’s thoughts on what he believes the Trump election means for future US Trade Policy regarding China.

‘Election Results:  U.S. China Relationship

Prepared by: Congressmen Don Bonker (Democrat)

Winston Churchill’s characterization of “democracy as the worst form of government except for all the others” was on full display in America’s 2016 presidential election.   Yesterday’s torrent of election results is revealing of America’s challenges ahead, not only domestically but internationally.  This report is focused on how the election results will affect the U.S. – China relationship.

CANDIDATES WEBSITE/POSITIONS ON CHINA

Hillary Clinton

Increase cooperation in areas of common interest

Reinforce alliances in the Asia-Pacific

Ratchet up the U.S. deterrent against Chinese cyberattacks

Take a stronger stance against China’s human rights record

Donald Trump

Increase U.S. military presence in and around the South China Sea

Investigate and punish China for unfair trade practices

Designate China a currency manipulator

Ratchet up the U.S. deterrent against Chinese cyberattacks

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION RESULTS.   U.S. presidents are not elected by the popular vote but the so-called Electoral College – each of the 50 states select “electors” equal to the number of Congressmen — that determines the outcome.  The margin is significant in that a sweeping victory with over 300 electoral votes will demonstrate a public mandate that will make the newly elected Presidents’ governing more effective.  This year, Donald Trump’s victory with 289 electoral votes [which is now with Michigan and Arizona 309 votes] is not a big margin but his party being in control of both the Senate and House of Representatives, is a sufficient mandate, something of a populist uprising not seen in recent years.

The election of Donald Trump was unexpected and shocking, even troubling to many in the U.S. and around the world.  The electoral vote is revealing of why and how he won the election – his anti-trade and immigration messages resonated in the four or five rust-belt states that were expected to vote for Hillary Clinton.   Not unlike the Brexit vote, he played to the anger and fear that was directed at Wall Street and Washington, D.C., a movement that will definitely take the country in a new and perilous direction.

Most disconcerting is how a President Trump will conduct foreign policy given that he has no experience compared to Hillary Clinton, who served as Secretary of State and was expected to continue the Obama Administration’s policies and alliances with other countries.  The U.S. China relationship is all about economics and trade, so his Seven-Step Trade Plan is an indication of what lies ahead:

Immediate withdraw from TPP and a renegotiation of NAFTA.

Appoint the “toughest and smartest trade negotiators.

Direct Department of Commerce to “identify every violation of trade agreements a foreign country is currently using to harm our worker” and direct all Federal agencies to use “every tool under American and international law” to end abuses.

Instruct the Treasury Department to label China a currency manipulator, promising that any international devaluation would be met with sharply through tariffs and taxes.

The U.S. Trade Representatives would be instructed to bring trade cases against Beijing under both U.S. laws and the WTO.

If China does not stop its illegal activities, Trump said he would invoke specific safeguards and tariff protections under Section 201 of the Trade Act of 1974.

U.S. China Relationship

In past years, presidential candidates have been known for their “tough talk on China” during campaigns but eventually succumb to the geopolitical realities once they become president.  Donald Trump has gone way beyond tough talk in that he has been relentless in his China bashing and threats to take punishing actions based on unfair trade practices.

More alarming have been his comments threatening the U.S. – China relationship, on one occasion stating that “I’d love to have a trade war with China…if we did no business with China, frankly we will save a lot of money.”  This hopefully is more about rhetoric than policy and a sitting President and his advisors will be more realistic and engage China in ways that will be mutually beneficial.

Ultimately, it’s not so much about the rhetoric and issues but the relationship between the two heads of state.  President Obama and President Xi Jinping had a “trust” working relationship that may not go as easily with Donald Trump, but he is a master negotiator who knows how to work out deals with others.  Much will also depend on who will be his cabinet ministers and senior advisors.

U.S. – International.    Donald Trump’s election has many world leaders concerned given his pledge of radical actions that will project a different America.  For the past 50 years, America has been the undisputed leader worldwide but that is about to change, partly because both Donald Trump’s election is rooted in American anxiety, placing the blame on globalization and trade deals for job losses and economic hardship.  In recent years partisanship and politicalizing of U.S. foreign policy has intensified in a way that inhibits a President’s ability maintain America’s leadership globally.

What does this mean in terms of America’s leadership internationally?  The reverberating message and new mandate that comes out of the election may be alarming to foreign leaders in that a Trump Administration’s foreign policy will be unpredictable, to be sure, on both the economic and geopolitical fronts that will lead to greater uncertainty.  It will definitely be more protectionist given Mr. Trump’s ranting that trade deals have caused job losses and economic hardship.  More perplexing is whether a Trump presidency will abandon America’s alliances and commitments and embark on a course that is more self-serving.

Regardless of who was elected, one of the realities will be China possibly surpassing America as the world’s most powerful nation, which will be a dramatic wake-up call for a country that has proudly embraced this status for the past hundred years.  A Trump presidency taking the country down the path of isolationism may have America backing away from its global responsibilities compared to China’s highly focused set of objectives and its growing presence internationally.  Indeed, China has wisely avoided involvement in geopolitical and security issues, such as the Middle East, and instead is concentrating on economic and investment development, which rapidly advances their leadership standing around the world.

CONGRESSIONAL ELECTIONS    

Two weeks before the election, the Democrats were expected to take control of the U. S. Senate hopefully gaining enough seats to be the Majority Party that would be fully supportive of a Hillary Clinton presidency.  Instead the Republicans will now control both branches of the U.S. government.  However, it will not represent a consensus or cooperation given the deep divisions within the Republican Party, particularly how the Trump candidacy shattered political convention by criticizing Congressional leaders and charting his own path

U.S. Senate.  The Constitution specifies that one-third of the Senate positions are up every election year, which worked to the advantage of Democrats since most of the ballot positions were Republicans.  Yet the election results favored the Republicans who will maintain their 51-45 advantage for the next two years.  The Senate has the Constitutional authority to approve treaties and appointments to high-level positions and ambassadors.  There should be cooperation, given that the same party controls both branches, but Donald Trump has defied the conventional approach to doing business, so this will add to the uncertainty.

House of Representatives.  For the past six years the Republicans have been in control with a significant margin, despite divisions of within the Party that inhibits their ability to be productive.  Prior to the election, the Republicans held 247 of the 435 seats that are up for election every year, a safe margin.  While the Democrats did pick up eleven of the Republican held seats they will continue as the Minority Party for the next few years.

The same party in control of the White House and Congress would normally make for a productive session, but uncertainty lingers given the troubled relationship between Donald Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan.  Prior to the elections, a fractured Republican Party has been unified only by its opposition to President Obama’s policies, like Obamacare, so many questions remain about how the Speaker will preside over his own problems as he prepares to work with a Trump Administration.

In contrast to Congressman Bonker, my belief is that the US China relationship may, in fact, work out better than people think under President Trump.  While in China last month I met many Chinese who liked Trump, despite his trade policy, which was enlightening.

Although Trump will be tough in trade negotiations, Trump is a business man and likes to do deals.  That means he is truly open to negotiations.

Also many Conservative publications, such as the Wall Street Journal and Investors Business Daily (“IBD”), believe that Republican Congressional leaders, such as House Speaker Paul Ryan, may be able to prevent Trump from starting an all-out, hot, trade war against China.

But the US China cold trade war will definitely continue as there will be more US trade actions against China, and more Chinese trade actions against the US.  Both countries will feel the pain.

But the relationship will become even more complicated as the EC in response to the WTO December 11, 2016 deadline to grant China market economy status proposed on November 9th amending its antidumping and countervailing law to provide that although for WTO members normal value is determined on the basis of actual prices and costs in the foreign market, in certain circumstances, e.g., China, where prices and costs are distorted because of government intervention and not free market forces, the EC Commission can look at prices and costs outside China.

EC PROPOSES CHANGES TO ITS ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING LAW TO IN EFFECT CONTINUE TO TREAT CHINA AS A NONMARKET ECONOMY COUNTRY

On November 9, 2016 the European Commission issued the attached proposed “Regulation of the European Parliament and Of The Council,” ec-china-market-economy-regs, on the way to calculate normal value for certain nonmarket economy countries, specifically China.

The EC Commission has proposed amending its antidumping law to provide that although for WTO members normal value is determined on the basis of actual prices and costs in the foreign market, in certain circumstances, where prices and costs are distorted because of government intervention and not free market forces, e.g., China, the EC Commission can look at prices and costs outside China, stating specifically if:

domestic prices and costs would not provide a reasonable basis to determine the normal value. This could be the case, for instance, when prices or costs are not the result of free market forces because they are affected by government intervention. Relevant considerations in this respect include, for instance, the fact that the market in question is to a significant extent served by enterprises which operate under the ownership, control or policy supervision or guidance of the authorities of the exporting country; the state presence in firms allowing the state to interfere with respect to prices or costs; the existence of public policies or measures discriminating in favour of domestic suppliers or otherwise influencing free market forces; and the access to finance granted by institutions implementing public policy objectives.

In such circumstances, it would be inappropriate to use domestic prices and costs to determine the value at which the like product should be normally sold (“the normal value”) and a new provision (Article 2(6)a) stipulates that the normal value would instead be constructed on the basis of costs of production and sale reflecting undistorted prices or benchmarks. For this purpose, the sources that may be used would include undistorted international prices, costs, or benchmarks, or corresponding costs of production and sale in an appropriate representative country with a similar level of economic development as the exporting country.

This methodology would allow the Commission to establish and measure the actual magnitude of dumping being practised in normal market conditions absent distortions.

For the sake of transparency and efficiency, the Commission services intend to issue public reports describing the specific situation concerning the market circumstances in any given country or sector. Of importance, the EU industry would be in a position to rely on and refer to the information contained in these reports when alleging in a complaint or a request for review that the domestic prices and costs in the exporting country are unsuitable to determine the normal value. Such reports and the evidence on which it is based would also be placed on the file of any investigation relating to that country or sector so that all interested parties would be in a position to express their views and comments.  . . .

In the light of experience gained in past proceedings, it is appropriate to clarify the circumstances in which significant distortions affecting to a considerable extent free market forces may be deemed to exist. In particular, it is appropriate to clarify that this situation may be deemed to exist, inter alia, when reported prices or costs, including the costs of raw materials, are not the result of free market forces because they are affected by government intervention. It is further appropriate to clarify that in considering whether or not such a situation exists regard may be had, inter alia, to the potential impact of the following: the market in question is to a significant extent served by enterprises which operate under the ownership, control or policy supervision or guidance of the authorities of the exporting country; state presence in firms allowing the state to interfere with respect to prices or costs; public policies or measures discriminating in favour of domestic suppliers or otherwise influencing free market forces; and access to finance granted by institutions implementing  public policy objectives. It is further appropriate to provide that the Commission services  may issue a report describing the specific situation concerning these criteria in a certain country or a certain sector; that such report and the evidence on which it is based may be placed on the file of any investigation relating to that country or sector . . . .

It is further appropriate to recall that costs should normally be calculated on the basis of records kept by the exporter or producer under investigation. However, where there are significant distortions in the exporting country with the consequence that costs reflected in the records of the party concerned are artificially low, such costs may be adjusted or established on any reasonable basis, including information from other representative markets or from international prices or benchmarks. In the light of experience gained in past proceedings, it is appropriate to further clarify that, for the purposes of applying the provisions introduced by this regulation, due account should be taken of all relevant evidence, including relevant assessment reports regarding the circumstances prevailing on the domestic market of the exporting producers and the evidence on which they are based, which has been placed on the file, and upon which interested parties have had an opportunity to . . .

Article 1

Regulation (EU) 2016/1036 is amended as follows:

In Article 2 the following paragraph 6a is inserted:

‘6a. (a) In case it is determined, when applying this provision or any other relevant provision of this Regulation, that it is not appropriate to use domestic prices and costs in the exporting country due to the existence of significant distortions, the normal value shall be constructed on the basis of costs of production and sale reflecting undistorted prices or benchmarks. For this purpose, the sources that may be used include undistorted international prices, costs, or benchmarks, or corresponding costs of production and sale in an appropriate representative country with a similar level of economic development as the exporting country, provided the relevant cost data are readily available. The constructed normal value shall include a reasonable amount for administrative, selling and general costs and for profits.

Significant distortions for the product concerned within the meaning of point (a) may be deemed to exist, inter alia, when reported prices or costs, including the costs of raw materials, are not the result of free market forces as they are affected by government intervention. In considering whether or not significant distortions exist regard may be had, inter alia, to the potential impact of the following: the market in question is to a significant extent served by enterprises which operate under the ownership, control or policy supervision or guidance of the authorities of the exporting country; state presence in firms allowing the state to interfere with respect to prices or costs; public policies or measures discriminating in favour of domestic suppliers or otherwise influencing free market forces; and access to finance granted by institutions implementing public policy objectives.

In Article 11(4), the following subparagraph is added:

‘In the case of a transition from a normal value calculated pursuant to the former Articles 2(7)(a) or 2(7)(b) to a normal value calculated pursuant to paragraphs 1 to 6a of Article 2, any review pursuant to this paragraph shall be deferred to the date on which the first expiry review following such transition is initiated.’

STEEL TRADE CASES

CERTAIN CARBON AND ALLOY STEEL CUT TO LENGTH PLATE FROM AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, CHINA, FRANCE GERMANY, ITALY, JAPAN, KOREA AND TAIWAN

On November 7, 2016, in the attached fact sheet, factsheet-multiple-ctl-plate-ad-prelim-11082016, Commerce announced its affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty investigations of imports of certain carbon and alloy steel cut-to-length plate from Austria, Belgium, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.

For Austria, the antidumping rate is 41.97%.  For Belgium, the antidumping rate ranges from 2.41 to 8.5%.  For China, the antidumping rate is 68.27%.  For France, the antidumping rate ranges from 4.26 to 12.97%.  For Germany, the antidumping rate ranges from 0 to 6.56%.  For Italy, the antidumping rate ranges from 6.10 to 130.63%.  For Japan, the antidumping rate ranges from 14.96 to 48.64%.  For Korea the antidumping rate is 6.82%.  For Taiwan, the antidumping rate ranges from 3.51 to 28%.

CIRCULAR WELDED CARBON-QUALITY STEEL PIPE FROM OMAN, PAKISTAN, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES, AND VIETNAM

On October 24, 2016, Commerce in the attached fact sheet, pipe, announced its affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe from Oman, Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam, and countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from Pakistan.

For Oman, the antidumping rate is 7.24%.  For Pakistan, the antidumping rate is 11.08% and the countervailing duty rate is 64.81%.  For United Arab Emirates the antidumping rates range from 5.58% to 6.43%.  For Vietnam the antidumping rate ranges from 0 to 113%

FOREIGN ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTY LAW AND CASES

UNIVERSAL TRADE WAR CONTINUES

With the election of Donald Trump, as stated in my last newsletter, the Universal Trade War will continue.  In addition to the US bringing antidumping and countervailing duty cases, countries around the World, such as EC, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, India, Turkey, Ukraine, Russia, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Australia Thailand, South Africa, and Vietnam, all are filing antidumping and countervailing duty cases against each other and the United States.  These countries have adopted the US law which finds dumping in 90% of the cases.  The US and the EC have created a Frankenstein in the antidumping law and the whole World has adopted it.

Compromise is the best way to settle trade disputes, but it is very difficult, if not impossible, to settle US antidumping and other trade cases.  What is “fair” trade for the United States is “fair” trade for every other country.  Many countries want to make their industries Great again.

Because of this situation, this part of the newsletter will concentrate on antidumping and countervailing duty cases in other countries.

CHINA

Set forth below are two articles by Chinese trade lawyers on how to respond in Chinese trade cases against the United States and other countries.

ROLAND ZHU, ALLBRIGHT LAW FIRM

A General Description of Anti-Dumping Regulation

of the People’s Republic of China

by Roland Zhu, Allbright Law Firm

In order to maintain foreign trade order and fair competition, China’s Ministry of Commerce (hereinafter referred to as “MOFCOM”) is responsible for conducting anti-dumping investigations against foreign exporters in case that imported products enter the market of the People’s Republic of China by way of dumping, and cause material damage or constitute a threat of material damage to an already established domestic industry, or cause a material impediment to the establishment of a domestic industry in accordance with the Foreign Trade Law of the People’s Republic of China, Regulations of the People’s Republic of China on Anti-Dumping and Interim Rules on Placing Cases on File for Antidumping Investigations, which are effective and applicable law.

Where there exists dumping or may exist dumping, an anti-dumping investigation may arise. A complete set of anti-dumping investigation procedure usually follows these steps:

  1. MOFCOM may place a case on file for antidumping investigations upon the application of an applicant; it may also place a case on file on its own initiative for anti-dumping investigations.
  2. MOFCOM shall, within 60 days as of its receipt of the application letter and the relevant evidence submitted by the applicant, examine whether the application is filed by the domestic industry or filed by representing the domestic industry, the contents of the application letter and the evidence attached to it, etc., and shall decide to initiate an investigation or not. Prior to the decision to initiate an investigation, the government of the exporting country (region) concerned shall be notified.
  3. MOFCOM shall publish the decision to initiate an investigation and notify the applicant, the known exporters and importers, the government of the exporting country (region) and other interested organizations and parties (hereinafter collectively referred to as “the interested parties”). As soon as the decision to initiate an investigation is published, MOFCOM shall provide the full text of the written application to the known exporters and the government of the exporting country (region).
  4. MOFCOM may conduct an investigation and collect information from the interested parties by, among other methods, sending questionnaires, using samples, holding public hearings and making on-the-spot verification.
  5. MOFCOM shall, on the basis of its findings, make a preliminary determination on dumping and injury, as well as on whether there exists a causal link between dumping and injury. The preliminary determination shall be published by MOFCOM.
  6. In cases where a preliminary determination on dumping, injury and the causal link between the two is affirmative, MOFCOM shall conduct further investigations on dumping, the dumping margin, the injury and its degree, and, make a final determination on the basis of its findings. The final determination shall be published by MOFCOM. Before the final determination is made, MOFCOM shall inform all known interested parties of the essential facts on which the final determination is based.
  7. An anti-dumping investigation shall be concluded within 12 months from the date of publication of the decision to initiate the investigation, and the period may be extended in special circumstances, but in no case shall the extension be more than 6 months.
  8. The anti-dumping measures taken by MOFCOM shall include provisional anti-dumping measures, price undertakings and anti-dumping duties. The period for applying the provisional anti-dumping measures shall not exceed four months from the effective date set forth in the public notice regarding the decision on provisional anti-dumping measures, and, in special circumstances, may be extended to nine months. The period for the levy of an anti-dumping duty and fulfillment of a price undertaking shall not exceed five years, and may be extended if, as a result of the review, it is determined that the termination of the anti-dumping duty would possibly lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping and injury.
  9. The review proceedings shall be conducted with reference to the relevant provisions of Regulations of the People’s Republic of China on Anti-Dumping. Any review shall be concluded within 12 months from the date of the decision of initiation of such a review.

Answers to General Questions about Chinese Antidumping cases are listed below or you may refer to the general description of Chinese anti-dumping regulations.

  1. Information on recent cases filed in China against other countries

Answer: Please see the table below, which summarizes recent cases filed in China during the year of 2016 against other countries are:

Initiation Date  Subject Merchandise  Investigation Type  Countries

1/12/2016  Dried Distiller Grains        AD and CVD             USA

2/5/2016    Pyridine                                AD Interim Review  Japan and India

4/20/2015   Vinyldine Chloride           Initial AD Review       Japan

Vinyl Chloride Copolymer Resin

9/22/2016     Sugar                        Safeguard       Multiple Countries  including Brazil/Argentina

  1. What agency makes the AD and CVD decision? What agency makes the injury determination? How long does the initial investigation take?  Are there mandatory companies?

Answer: The Trade Remedy and Investigation Bureau of the Ministry of Commerce of the People’s Republic of China (the “Bureau”) makes the AD and CVD decisions as well as the injury determinations. An anti-dumping or countervailing investigation shall be concluded within 12 months from the date of publication of the decision to initiate the investigation, and the period may be extended in special circumstances, but in no case shall the extension be more than 6 months. There are mandatory companies in China’s AD investigation. The applicant, the known exporters and importers, the government of the exporting country (region) and other interested organizations and parties can register to the Bureau in order to participate in this anti-dumping investigation within 20 days from the date of promulgation of the initial announcement. The Bureau selects the respondents among those who have submitted dumping sampling questionnaire by using sampling survey. For other interested parties, including those are not chosen to answer the investigation questionnaire and those don’t register to the Bureau, the Bureau may make determinations on the basis of the facts already known and the best information available.

  1. Is the Chinese antidumping and countervailing duty law prospective or retrospective, retroactive liability? Is there a public interest test? Are there annual reviews?  How long do the orders stay in place?

Answer:  For retrospective issues you mentioned above, according to the Article 93 of Legislation Law of the People’s Republic of China, Chinese antidumping and countervailing duty law shall not be retroactive, but the regulations formulated specially for the purpose of better protecting the rights and interests of citizens, legal persons and other organizations are excepted. The period for the levy of an anti-dumping duty shall not exceed 5 years, and may be extended as appropriate if, as a result of the review, it is determined that the termination of the anti-dumping duty would possibly lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping and injury. A midterm review may be conducted upon request by the interested parties and on the basis of examination of the relevant evidence submitted by the interested parties.

  1. Are there special rules for Non Market Economy Countries?

Answer:  There are no such special rules in China.

Attached are several weekly newsletters, teams-newsletter-en-vol-2016-38 teams-newsletter-en-vol-2016-39 teams-newsletter-en-vol-2016-40, issued by Roland Zhu and his trade group at the Allbright Law Office.

FRANK HANG, GLOBAL LAW OFFICE

How Should Foreign Companies Respond to an Antidumping Investigation in China

  1. Definition of Dumping

According to Chinese Law, dumping consists of three factors-Dumping, Injury and Causation. As for the calculation of Dumping Margin, the following shall be taken into consideration:

  • Dumping Margin= (Normal Value-Export Price)/CIF Price
  • Normal Value and Export Price shall be compared on the same level, usually ex-factory level
  • Comparison: a. weighted average Normal Value to weighted average Export Price; b. transaction-to-transaction comparison of Normal Value and Export Price; c. weighted average Normal Value to each transaction Export Price.

When calculating the Normal Value, the following methods are chosen by MOFCOM:

  • Domestic Sales Price
  • Constructed Value=Production Cost + S G & A + Reasonable Profit
  • Export Price to a Third Country (Region)

In terms of category of AD Duty, China’s normal practice is to assign antidumping rates to producers, not trading companies. And there are 3 different types of rates for the enterprises to bear:

  • Individual Rate
  • Weighted Average Rate
  • Country-wide Rate (Best Information Available, BIA)

When it comes to Injury Analysis, several factors shall be considered by MOFCOM: Imported Volume, Imported Price and other factors such as actual and potential decline of domestic industry in sales, profits, output, market share, productivity, return on investment or utilization of capacity, etc., factors affecting domestic prices; the magnitude of the margin of dumping, the actual or potential negative effects of the dumped imports on the domestic industry’s cash flow, inventories, employment, wages, growth, ability of capital raising or investment, etc.

Cumulative Assessment means that the margin of dumping established in relation to the dumped imports from each country (region) is no less than 2 percent, and the volume of such imports from each country (region) is not negligible. It is negligible if the volume of the dumped imports from a particular country (region) is found to account for less than 3 percent of the total imports of the like products, unless countries (regions) which individually account for less than 3 percent of the total imports of the like products collectively account for more than 7 percent of the total imports of the like products.

  1. AD Investigating Procedures

In China, the AD Investigating Authority is MOFCOM Trade Remedy and Investigation Bureau who is not only in charge of determination of dumping margin but also in charge of determination of injury and causation. 

Following procedures in a Chinese AD Investigation Case: Filing of the Petition are:

Filing Responding Registration, Issuing Questionnaires, Submitting Questionnaire Responses, Preliminary Determination, Public Hearing, On-site Verification, Final Determination, Price Undertaking, Administrative Reconsideration, Administrative Lawsuit, Interim Review, Sun-set Review, New Shipper Review, etc.

Within 10 working days after the deadline of filing the responding registration, the investigating authority will issue questionnaires to the registered companies. If the registered companies are numerous, the investigating authority will use sampling (usually 2 mandatory companies for each country/area).

It is important to note that foreign producers/foreign exporters must submit their responding registration documents to the investigating authority within 20 days as of the date of initiation through a PRC practicing attorney or by themselves. If they fail to do so, foreign producers will be treated as non-cooperative and MOFCOM will use the best information available (“BIA”) to make determination.

For the respondents, when submitting Questionnaire Response, they need to keep in mind that the questionnaire response must be submitted to the investigating authority within 37 days as of the date of the issuance of the questionnaires. The responding companies may apply for extension and the investigating authorities usually only give an extension of 7 days. And the questionnaire responses must be submitted through a PRC practicing attorney. After receiving the questionnaire responses, the investigating authority will review them and issue the supplementary questionnaires if certain questions require clarification or explanation further.

In an Interim Review, an application for interim review shall be filed within 30 days as of the expiration date of each year after the effective date of AD measures. The producers applying for interim reviews must have exported the subject merchandise to China within a period of 12 months prior to the application, and the export referred must have been made in sufficient quantities.

  1. Key Points of AD Defense Strategies
  • Establishing an overall responding strategy before submitting the questionnaire responses to MOFCOM;
  • Collaborating with the respondent’s department of administration, sales, production, finance, in-house counsel, foreign attorneys, PRC attorneys closely and efficiently;
  • Accountant’s role is important in the calculation of dumping margin;
  • Well-prepared for on-site verification;
  • Communicating effectively with MOFCOM officials at different levels;
  • Cooperate with other respondents on non-injury defense;
  • Leverage the exporting country (region)’s government;
  • Obtaining support from importers and down-stream companies.

INDIA

Attached is a newsletter, ls-international-trade-amicus-september-2016, from the Lakshmikumaran & Sridharan Law Firm in New Delhi on Indian antidumping law.

CUSTOMS LAW

ALUMINUM EXTRUSIONS

On October 26, 2016, the Wall Street Journal in an article entitled “Homeland Security Probes U.S. Aluminum Firms Over Chinese Imports” reported that Federal investigators had launched an investigation into whether Liu Zhongtian, a Chinese billionaire and the founder and chairman of aluminum giant China Zhongwang Holdings Ltd., was engaged in transshipment of aluminum extrusions to the United States in violation of US civil and criminal laws.

Commerce is investigating whether a New Jersey company, Aluminum Shapes LLC, imported pallets to remelt as a way to avoid a countervailing duty rate of 374%, part of a broader probe into Mr. Liu’s activities. The Commerce Department said preliminary findings would be released in coming weeks. Aluminum Shapes last month denied that the pallets were used as raw material for its plant.

Homeland Security is also investigating whether nearly one million tons of aluminum shipped to Aluminicaste Fundición de México, a factory once owned by Mr. Liu’s son, were part of an effort to evade U.S. tariffs by routing the metal through another country to disguise its origins.

SECTION 337 AND IP CASES

NEW 337 CASES

OPTICAL FIBERS

On October 31, 2016, DSM Deso Tech, Inc. and DSM IP Assets B.V. filed a 337 patent case against UV Curable Coatings for Optical Fibers, Coated Optical Fibers, and Products from China.  The relevant parts of the ITC notice along with the names of the Chinese respondent companies are below.

Commodity:

UV Curable Coatings for Optical Fibers, Coated Optical Fibers, and Products

Filed By:
Christine E. Lehman

Firm/Organization:
Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett, & Dunner, LLP

Behalf Of:

DSM Deso Tech, Inc. and DSM IP Assets B.V.

Description:

Letter to Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, USITC; requesting that the Commission conduct an investigation under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, regarding Certain UV Curable Coating for Optical Fibers, Coated Optional Fibers, and Products Containing Same. The proposed respondents are Momentive UV Coatings (Shanghai) Co., Ltd., China and OFS Fitel, LLC, Norcross, Georgia.

SWEETENERS

On October 27, 2016, Celanese filed a 337 patent case against High Potency Sweeteners, ACE-K, from China.  The relevant parts of the ITC notice along with the names of the Chinese respondent companies are below.

Commodity:

High-Potency Sweeteners

Filed By:

Joshua B. Pond

Firm/Organization:

Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP

Behalf Of:
Celanese International Corporation, Celanese Sales U.S. Ltd. and Celanese IP Hungary Bt

Description:

Letter to Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, USITC; requesting that the Commission conduct an investigation under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, regarding Certain High-Potency Sweeteners, Processes for Making Same, and Products Containing Same. The proposed respondents are Suzhou Hope Technology Co., Ltd., China; Anhui Jinhe Industrial Co., Ltd., China; and Vitasweet Co., Ltd.,   China.

MOBILE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

On October 14, 2016, Qualcomm filed a 337 patent case against Mobile Electronic Devices from China.  The relevant parts of the ITC notice along with the names of the Chinese respondent companies are below.

Received:

Friday, October 14, 2016

Commodity:

Mobile Electronic Devices

Filed By:

Blaney Harper

Firm/Organization:

Jones Day

Behalf Of:

Qualcomm Incorporated

Description:

Letter to Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, USITC; requesting that the Commission conduct an investigation under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, regarding Certain Mobile Electronic Devices. The proposed respondents are Zhuhai Meizu Technology Co., Ltd., China; Zhuhai Meizu Telecom Equipment Co., Ltd., China; Dest Technology Limited, China; LGYD Limited, China; and Overseas Electronics, Inc., Chicago, IL.

If you have any questions about these cases or about Trump and Trade, US trade policy, TPP, the antidumping or countervailing duty law, trade adjustment assistance, customs, False Claims Act or 337 IP/patent law in general, please feel free to contact me.

Best regards,

Bill Perry

 

US CHINA TRADE DEVELOPMENTS TRADE, CRIMINAL IP, ANTITRUST AND SECURITIES

Smithsonian Castle Statue  Night With Stars Washington DCDear Friends,

There have been some new developments in the trade, solar cells, 337/patents, antitrust and securities areas.

TRADE

SOLAR CELLS NEGOTIATIONS

Recently EC officials have returned to Brussels after about two weeks of negotiations in Beijing without an agreement that would resolve the Solar Cells fight with China.  Talks continue, less than a month before preliminary EC antidumping (AD) duties on Chinese solar imports are due to ratchet up to more than triple their current amount on Aug. 6.

On the Chinese side, the talks are being handled primarily by the China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Machinery and Electronic Products (CCCME).

The solar cell negotiations between China and EC continue, but the devil is in the details.  The hurdle is creating a deal that the EC can defend as eliminating the injury to the EC producers without demanding a floor price so high that the Chinese government abandons negotiations and walks away.

The talks include discussions on both a floor price for solar wafers, cells and modules — more commonly called panels — and voluntary quantitative restrictions, but there appears to be no breakthrough.

One contact stated that the EC offered up a floor price of 65 eurocents per watt, but indicated that would not be acceptable to the EC industry because it would barely over the cost of production.  For the Chinese industry, however, a price floor of 65 eurocents would be a huge concession that the Chinese companies could not accept.

The EC imposed AD duties of 11.8%, but these would go up to 47.6 percent or higher next month unless a deal is reached.

In the US, however, negotiations are still down the road.  There have been initial, informal discussions between the U.S. and China on a potential settlement of the trade cases with USTR added by the Commerce Department leading the initiative.

But so far there is no plan for the U.S. to be party to any eventual EU-China arrangement. The EC has not welcomed the idea because that it fears that US involvement could complicate already difficult negotiations.

If the EC and China are able to reach a deal, however, it will almost certainly influence any potential deal between the US and China.  One problem, however, is the third country loophole.  Unless the loophole is eliminated, the U.S. industry is unlikely to be interested in a deal, and Chinese companies have adjusted to the US order by obtaining the solar cells from third countries.  The third country loophole allows China to export solar cells produced in third countries, such as Taiwan, in panels and modules produced in China to the United States.

In the EC 18 out of 27 EC countries are opposed to the case so if there is no deal, the Chinese government may walk away and take a chance that the member states will overturn the case.

In the US on the technical side, one of the key issues is the legal basis under which the Obama administration can seek a settlement given that the AD and CVD orders are now in effect. The time for negotiating a suspension agreement in a case is legally set between a preliminary and a final determination, which has now passed.

In the preliminary explorations of a potential settlement, the U.S. has discussed the option of a changed circumstances review as a legal basis. Such a review would assess whether the existing U.S. trade remedy cases are still needed or could be replaced with a settlement. But that option would require the consent of the U.S. industry.

As indicated in past posts on this blog, on June 4th, the Solar Cell case really heated up as the EC issued a preliminary antidumping decision on Solar Cells from China with a preliminary antidumping rate of 11% that would escalate by August 5th to a rate as high as 67.9%.

In a March 2013 hearing of the Senate Finance Committee, Subcommittee on Trade, Senator Ron Wyden, the Chairman and the political supporter of Solar World, pressured Acting USTR Demetrios Marantis for a global agreement in the Solar Cells situation. The US Solar Cells Trade case has not worked and has not protected the US domestic industry. Prices for solar cells in the US have only gone up by $3. Also in response to the US case, the Chinese Government has brought an antidumping and countervailing duty cases against $2 billion of imports of US produced polysilicon, which goes into the Chinese solar cells.

A negotiated settlement would also result in the removal of Chinese antidumping and countervailing duties on US and EC produced polysilicon.

DIAMOND SAWBLADES– SECTION 751 CHANGED CIRCUMSTANCES ITC INVESTIGATION

On July 11, 2013, Husqvarna Construction Products North America, Inc. filed a request for a 751 changed circumstances investigation at the ITC on Diamond Sawblades and Parts from China.  In the attached petition, Req for Commission Review-7-11-13 Husqvarna argues that the Commission reached a 3-3, tie vote, in the Diamond Sawblades case only by cumulating, that is adding together the imports of Korea and China.

The Commerce Department, however, has now determined to revoke the antidumping order on diamond sawblades from Korea because there was no dumping during the period of investigation.   In addition, Huqvarna is the largest domestic producer and now opposes the order.  Finally, the other US producers in response to the order have expanded with low-cost foreign manufacturing affiliates, rather than expanding their US production.

 ALUMINUM EXTRUSIONS—NOW COMES EVASION

On June 21st, ICE, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested 5 individuals from Sultana Screens and Aluminum and PRP Trading for importing aluminum extrusions from China by passing false and fraudulent invoices and documents to CBP to defraud the US of approximately $26.7 million in antidumping and countervailing duties.  See the attached announcement. ICE ANNOUNCEMENT ALUMINUM

 ALUMINUM EXTRUSIONS — NEW REVIEW COVERS MANY MORE CHINESE COMPANIES

On June 28, Commerce initiated the Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Review Investigations on Aluminum Extrusions from China naming many Chinese companies based on a request by petitioners.  See the attached notice.  ALUMINUN EXTRUSIONS INITIATION NOTICE

Separate Rate applications are due August 27th at Commerce.

CAFC LAMINATED WOVEN SACKS

On June 24th, in AMS Associates, Inc. v. United States, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed the Commerce Department’s determination in the Laminated Woven Sacks case that where the Chinese company withdrew the evidence on the record, the Commerce Department was correct in giving the Chinese company the country wide rate.  See the attached decision.  CAFC SACKS DECISION

 IMPORTERS’ LOBBYING COALITION AGAINST EXPANSION OF ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTY LAWS AGAINST CHINA

As mentioned in prior newsletters, we are working on establishing a US importers/end users lobbying coalition to lobby against the expansion of the antidumping and countervailing duty laws against China.  Our first organizational meeting will be July 24th in Washington DC.  If anyone is interested in the Coalition, please feel free to contact me.

The objective of the Coalition will be to educate the US Congress and Administration on the damaging effects of the US trade war, especially the impact of US antidumping and countervailing duty laws, on US importers and US downstream industries.

We will be targeting two major issues—Working for market economy treatment for China in 2016 and Working against retroactive liability for US importers. The key point of our arguments is that these changes in the US antidumping and countervailing duty laws are to help US companies, especially US importers and downstream industries.

16 US importers in a number of different industries have joined the Coalition, but we continue to search for additional members.

COMMERCE DEPARTMENT SEPARATE RATES REGULATIONS

On July 5th the Commerce Department issued a regulatory announcement in the Federal Register COMMERCE DE FACTO REGULATION stating that in determining whether Chinese or other companies in Nonmarket Economy Countries were entitled to a separate rate in antidumping cases, it would examine more closely whether the company meets certain de facto criteria for obtaining a seaprate rates.  See the attached Federal Register notice

Commerce specifically stated that it will examine on a case by case basis certain issues related to a respondent’s separate rate status in nonmarket economy dumping cases.  This action is part of its Trade Enforcement initiative.

In determining whether a Chinese or other nonmarket economy company is entitled to a separate rate, Commerce looks at the following criteria, whether the Chinese/NME company:

• has export prices set by or subject to approval of a governmental agency;

• has authority to negotiate and sign contracts and other agreements on the company’s behalf;

• has autonomy from the government in decision making on management;

• retains proceeds of its export sales and makes independent decisions regarding disposition of profits or financing of losses.

Since respondents generally possess information on their day-to-day operations, Commerce will consider, on a case-by-case basis, issuing supplemental questionnaires to identify and review additional documentation and information relating to de facto government control by any level of government in cases where the respondent’s initial questionnaire responses are insufficient to support its separate rate claim. Supplemental questions might address:

• selection and removal of directors and managers at the producing/exporting company;

• identification of parties with authority to approve contracts and bank transactions on behalf of the company;

• ownership, including individual and corporate;

• whether any corporate owners are state-owned, state-controlled, or otherwise affiliated with the state, at the national or sub-national levels; and,

• whether any managers hold government positions at the national or sub-national levels.

Consistent with comments urging Commerce to conduct more separate rate verifications, Commerce said it would continue to consider verification of separate rate information where warranted, on a case-by-case basis.

This new regulation may make it harder for Chinese companies to obtain separate rates in antidumping investigations at the Commerce Department.

 NEW EU CASE AGAINST STONE IMPORTS FROM CHINA

If the granite fabricators had a problem with the Steel Sinks case, they may have a larger problem down the road.  On Friday the European Union launched an Antidumping investigation against imports of stone from China used in countertops and tiles.  The specific product is agglomerated stone – a material consisting of rock pieces held together by resin that is often used for kitchen and bathroom tiles and counter tops.  The complaint was filed by ASIA Europe.

EU cases are often followed by similar cases in the United States and vice versa.

CHINA ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTY CASE–WINE FROM THE EC

On July 1, 2013, China said it will initiate an antidumping and countervailing duty case against Wine from the EC.  See the attached initiation notice and press release from the Chinese Ministry of Commerce or MOFCOM. MOFCOM ANNOUNCEMENT MOFCOM NOTICE

Notices of appearance are due by July 24th at MOFCOM.

PATENTS

 CRIMINAL IP CASE AGAINST CHINESE COMPANY

In a highly unusual case, the US Justice Department has brought a criminal case and indictment against a Chinese Wind Tower company, Sinovel Wind Group Co.  SINOVEL COMPLAINT SINOVEL INDICTMENT In the attached complaint and indictment in United States v. Sinovel Wind Group, the Justice Department charged the Chinese company with stealing trade secrets including proprietary source code from its former vendor American Superconductor Corp. and causing it losses of more than $800 million.

An indictment filed Thursday in Wisconsin federal court targeted Sinovel along with two of its employees and former American Superconductor employee Dejan Karabasevic, 40, who allegedly gave source code stolen from American Superconductor’s computer system to Sinovel employees.

The indictment also targets Sinovel’s deputy director of its research department, Su Liylng and its technology manager, Zhao Halchun, both of whom allegedly convinced Karabasevic to come work for Sinovel and bring the stolen code with him.

“Today, we announce charges against Sinovel and three individuals for stealing proprietary wind-turbine technology from [American Superconductor] in order to produce their own turbines powered by stolen intellectual property” Acting Assistant Attorney General, Mythili Raman, said in a statement.

“This charged intellectual property theft caused significant harm to a domestic company that develops cutting edge technology and employs Americans throughout the country,” she said. “Stamping out intellectual property theft is a top priority for this administration and we will continue to work with our intellectual property task force partners to ensure that American ingenuity is protected.”

The indictment followed an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation into the code allegedly stolen from the Massachusetts-based firm, which it found were used in certain 1.5 megawatt Sinovel turbines, according to American Superconductor’s own statement Thursday on the charges.

American Superconductor has so far filed four suits against Sinovel in China over the alleged thefts, and has asked for more than $1 billion in damages, but Chinese courts have yet to address its claims.

“In the U.S., the Department of Justice has indicted Sinovel,” the U.S. firm’s CEO Daniel P. McGahn said in a statement Thursday. “In China, however, the legal system has yet to take substantive action. We believe this clearly demonstrates that the rights of foreign businesses are not being protected. The inability to rely on the rule of law is creating a risk for U.S. businesses operating in China.”

NEW 337 CASES

SILICON MICROPHONE PACKAGES

On June 21, 2013 Knowles Electronics, LLC filed a section 337 patent case against GoerTek, Inc., China; and GoerTek Electronics, Inc., Sunnyvale, California.

See ITC announcement below.

Docket No: 2962

Document Type: 337 Complaint

Filed By: Sturgis M Sobin

Firm/Org: Covington and Burling

Behalf Of: Knowles Electronics, LLC

Date Received: June 21, 2013

Commodity: Silicon Microphone Packages

Description: Letter to Lisa R. Barton, Acting Secretary, USITC; requesting that the Commission conduct an investigation under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended regarding Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same. The respondents are: GoerTek, Inc., China; and GoerTek Electronics, Inc., Sunnyvale, California.

If anyone wants short copies of the complaints, please feel free to contact me.

 PATENT CASES

 PATENT COMPLAINTS

Two patent complaints have been filed recently, June 17th complaint by Safe Storage v. Huawei and a June 25th complaint by Cellular Communications Equipment v. ZTE.  CELLULAR ZTE SAFE STORAGE HUAWEI

 ANTITRUST—PROPOSAL TO QUINTUPLE DAMAGE AWARDS IN CARTEL CASES

If Chinese respondents believe that triple damages are unfair, two antitrust professors are claiming that Congress should revise the law and provide 5x or quintuple damages for price fixing.  See the attached article, Cartels as Rational Business Strategy: Crime Pays by John M. Connor and Robert H. Lande.  QUINTUPLE ANTITRUST AWARDS

The two professors state at page 479 of their article:

“Perhaps the most straightforward policy conclusion that follows from our study would be to quintuple the overall current U.S. cartel sanction levels. A modest, ultra-conservative step in the right direction would be to double the average sanction level.”

SECURITIES

CHINESE GOVERNMENT AGREES TO RELEASE AUDIT DOCUMENTS TO SEC

On July 12th following the Strategic and Economic Dialogue talks led by U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, the Treasury Department announced that the Chinese government has agreed to turn over audit paperwork to the US Securities and Exchance Commission and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. China has also agreed to work with the United States to develop a cooperative process governing how the two nations oversee auditing foreign-listed companies.

The Chinese government has repeatedly resisted requests from the SEC and US regulators seeking the power to inspect Chinese auditing firms. The agreement between the two governments to protect investors and combat fraud comes following several high-profile accounting scandals, that have led to enforcement actions against fraud.

As Treasury Secretary Jack Lew stated on July 11th in the attached announcement:

“China’s securities regulator announced that it will begin providing certain requested audit work papers to our market regulators, an important step towards resolving a long-standing impasse on enforcement cooperation related to companies that are listed in the United States.”  TREASURY SECRETARY ANNOUNCEMENT PAPERWORK

CHINA MEDIA SEC COMPLAINT–SEC CROSS BORDER WORKING GROUP

Attached is a June 20th complaint filed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) against China Media Express Holdings Inc. in Washington DC federal court accusing the advertising company of fraud in grossly exaggerating its finances.  CHINA MEDIA COMPLAINT  The SEC complaint follows class action lawsuits against China Media Express.

The complaint alleges that China Media Express “massively overstated its cash balances” after it entered the public market in 2009, touting balances that overshot reality by 452 to over 40,000 percent.

This complaint is the latest product of the SEC’s Cross-Border Working Group, which cracks down on foreign-operating companies that are publicly traded in the United States.  Probes led by the Group have produced fraud cases against more than 65 foreign issuers or executives and forced more than 50 companies to de register securities.

If you have any questions about these cases or about the US trade, customs, patent, antitrust or securities law in general, please feel free to contact me.

Best regards,

Bill Perry

US CHINA TRADE WAR–CHINESE ANTIDUMPING CASE, TRADE, CUSTOMS, ANTITRUST, SECURITIES

Dragon Bronze Statue Gugong Forbidden City Palace Beijing ChinaDear Friends,

There have been more developments in the US China Trade War.

TRADE

TRADE WAR IN PULP, PAPER AND WOOD PRODUCTS

The most important development may be the February 6, 2013 decision of the Chinese government to launch a major antidumping case against the United States, Canada and Brazil on Cellulose Pulp.  The target is estimated to be about $2 billion in exports to China of Cellulose Pulp.

A translated version of the announcement by the Ministry of Commerce (“MOFCOM”) is attached.  2.2Cellulose Pulp Notice of Initiation_EN  The target companies in the US, Canada and Brazil are as follows:

US

Buckeye Technologies Inc

Rayonier Inc.

Cosmo Specialty Fibers, Inc.

Weyerhaeuser Company

GP Cellulose, LLC

CANADA

Tembec Inc

Fortress Specialty Cellulose INC

Neucel Specialty Cellulose Ltd

AV Nackawic Inc.

AV Cell Inc.

BRAZIL

Sateri Holdings Limited

The respondent companies now only have 20 days from the date of initiation or by approximately February 26th to enter a notice of appearance at MOFCOM.

One very important point of Chinese antidumping and countervailing duty law, which is different from US antidumping and countervailing duty law, Chinese Customs will assume that an imported product is in the case if it is imported under specific Tariff Code Numbers in the case.  In the Pulp Case, the specific Tariff Numbers are: 47020000, 47061000 and 47063000.

If an exporter or importer’s product is in the case, the burden is on them to go into MOFCOM and show that their product is out of the case and not covered by the antidumping or countervailing duty order.  A foreign company cannot assume its product is out of the case from the written description if its product is imported under the relevant Chinese HTS numbers

SOLAR CELLS

The Petitioners in the Solar Cells case have appealed the Commerce Department’s antidumping and countervailing duty decisions to the Court of International Trade.  One of the allegations in the complaints is directed at the Commerce Department’s decision to exclude Chinese Solar Panels and Modules when they include solar cells made in third countries.  Attached are copies of the complaints.  SOLAR WORLD AD COMPLAINT SOLAR WORLD COMPLAINT

CUSTOMS— ANTIDUMPING AND CVD COLLECTIONS

Customs has issued a large attached report on trade trends in 2012.  CUSTOMS YEAR END Customs reports that antidumping duties and countervailing duties have increased to record levels based on a record level of imports of $2.4 trillion.  The report states:

“Antidumping duty deposits increased by nearly $43 million to $329 million, a 13 percent increase over fiscal year 2011. Countervailing duty deposits more than doubled from $27 million in fiscal year 2011 to $69 million in fiscal year 2012, a 160 percent increase.”

SENATE LETTER ON MISSING ANTIDUMPING DUTIES

Meanwhile, Congress continues to increase pressure on Customs to collect the missing antidumping duties.  Attached is a February 7, 2013 letter to Customs from Senators Wyden and Thune protesting Customs failure to collect “massive amounts of duties under four antidumping (AD) orders” and, in particular, Customs failure to push the bond insurance companies to pay those missing duties.  SENATE LETTER RE MISSING BONDS FOR AD DUTIES  The letter states in part:

“These orders cover imports of honey, canned mushrooms, garlic and crawfish tail meat from China (Four Orders).  We found CBP’s response deeply troubling and glaringly incomplete. It failed to provide any meaningful answers to our questions about the hundreds of single-entry “new shipper” bonds CBP accepted to secure the payment of AD duties assessed under the Four Orders.

Our request was based on the following, widely-acknowledged facts:

l. According to CBP’s own data, the agency failed to collect almost $1 billion in AD duties assessed under the Four Orders from 2003-2011. It collected less than 10 percent of all duties assessed under those orders during that period.

2. The bulk of these duties are owed by importers who entered goods from exporters that were undergoing “new shipper” administrative reviews under the Four Orders before 2006.

3. Most of those duties are secured by single entry bonds (SEBs), which the importers were required to post with CBP upon entry. Each bond has a face value of two to four times the total value of the covered imports. According to CBP’s own data, the combined value of all SEBs on unliquidated entries from new shipper exporters under the Four Orders totaled $347 million as of Oct. 1, 2007.

This does not include the total value of such bonds that secured the assessed, but unpaid, duties under those orders as of that date.

4. In the wake of the importers’ massive and ongoing defaults, the insurance companies – sureties – that issued the bonds have, with rare exception, refused to pay CBP despite their legal obligation to do so.

5. Prior to the domestic producers’ filing of a lawsuit in April 2009 to compel the sureties to pay under the bonds and CBP to take legal action against the sureties, CBP had not filed a single collections lawsuit against any of the issuing sureties. Subsequent to the dismissal of that lawsuit, CBP has filed only a relatively small number of such actions.

CBP’s apathy in taking actions to collect the duties that the American people are owed is troubling, particularly at a time when the nation faces unprecedented fiscal challenges.  Collecting revenue and enforcing the trade laws is the central mission of the agency, yet the agency appears less and less interested in performing its statutory job. The American people are owed duties that are secured by sureties that issued these bonds. It is your responsibility to collect these substantial funds, which we understand could approach $500 million, without further delay.”

COUNTERFEIT TOYS FROM CHINA 

Attached is a Justice Department announcement of criminal indictment against several individuals and five corporations for importing and selling hazardous toys in violation of the Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA) and toys bearing copyright-infringing images and counterfeit trademarks, smuggling, and money laundering.  The companies are: Family Product USA Inc., H.M. Import USA Corp., ZCY Trading Corp., Zone Import Corp. and ZY Wholesale Inc.  COUNTERFEIT TOYS

ANTITRUST

VITAMIN C CASE

In the Vitamin C case, one of the defendants, North China Pharmaceutical Group Corp. (“NCPGC”), moved for summary judgment, arguing that it should be dismissed from this litigation.  DISMISSES MOTION TO EXCLUDE CHINA NORTH PHARMACEUTICAL The Court denied the motion, finding that:

“ plaintiffs carried their burden of demonstrating a genuine dispute of material fact with regard to NCPGC’s participation in the alleged conspiracy. Although NCPGC has offered a great deal of evidence that strongly suggests it was not involved in the conspiracy, that evidence is not sufficient to persuade the Court that no reasonable jury could find that NCPGC was a participant in the alleged conspiracy.”

The Vitamin C case is now going to trial after the Court dimissed all efforts of Chinese companies to get out of the case.

SECURITIES

The Corporate/Securities world is abuzz because of a recent bench ruling by Chancellor Leo E. Strine, Jr., of the Delaware Court of Chancery, refusing to dismiss claims alleging that the former outside directors of a Delaware corporation doing business in China had breached their fiduciary duty of loyalty. The plaintiffs claimed that the directors failed their oversight function by not detecting the theft in China of the corporation’s primary assets by the Chairman in China.

Chancellor Strine firmly stated:

“if you’re going to have a company domiciled for purposes of its relations with its investors in Delaware and the assets and operations of that company are situated in China that, in order for you to meet your obligation of good faith, you better have your physical body in China an awful lot.”

The Chancellor further warned that the outside directors “better have in place a system of controls to make sure that you know that you actually own the assets” and “have the language skills to navigate the environment in which the company is operating.”

The case is In re Puda Coal, Inc. Stockholders Litigation, C.A. No. 6476-CS (Del. Ch. Feb. 6, 2013) and involves a US Delaware corporation that is the subject of a Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) enforcement and a federal securities law class action based on fraud.  The auditor found that the company’s chairman had inappropriately transferred the company’s primary operating subsidiary to himself. The SEC suspended trading in the company’s stock, and the outside directors later resigned from the board of directors due to an alleged lack of cooperation from the company in trying to investigate and pursue the company’s claims.

In the Delaware case, the stockholder-plaintiffs alleged that the directors had acted in bad faith by failing to adequately monitor the corporation.  The court held that the former outside directors breached their fiduciary duty of loyalty by failing to discharge their oversight function.  The Chancellor stated that the directors “have a duty not to be dummy directors”

If you have any questions about these cases or the legal areas, please feel free to contact me.

Best regards,

Bill Perry

DEVELOPMENTS–TRADE, CUSTOMS/TARIFFS, 337/IP/PATENT, DRYWALL PRODUCT LIABILITY, ARBITRATION

Zhengyang Gate from Walking Street Tiananmen Square Beijing Chin There have been major developments in the Trade, Customs, 337/IP, Patent, Products Liability and Arbitration areas.

TRADE DEVELOPMENTS

SHRIMP FROM CHINA, VIETNAM, INDIA AND OTHER COUNTRIES

A new countervailing duty case has been filed against Shrimp from China and a number of other countries.  See the announcement below.  If anyone wants a copy of the complaint, please feel free to contact me.

Docket No: 2928 

Document Type: 701 Petition

Filed By: Elizabeth J. Drake

Firm/Org: Stewart and Stewart

Behalf Of: Coalition of Gulf Shrimp Industries (COGSI)

Date Received: December 28, 2012

Commodity: Frozen Warmwater Shrimp

Country: People’s Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam

Description: Letter to Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, USITC; requesting the Commission to conduct an investigation under section 701 of the Tariff Act of 1930 regarding the imposition of countervailing duties on U.S. imports of Certain Warmwater Shrimp from the People’s Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

Status: 701-TA-491-497

XANTHAN GUM FROM CHINA–COMMERCE DEPARTMENT PRELIMINARY ANTIDUMPING DETERMINATION

Today, the Commerce Department announced its preliminary antidumping duty determination in the Xanthan Gum from China.  Fufeng Biotechnologies Co., Co., Ltd.  received 21.69% and Deosen Biochemical Ltd. 127.65%.  The separate rate companies received 74.67%, and the rate for the rest of China is 154.07%.

Attached are the preliminary Federal Register notice and fact statement. Xanthan Gum Prelim FR (signed)  Xanthan Gum FS Prelim

CURTAIN WALL DECISION APPEALED TO THE COURT OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE

The Commerce Department’s decision to extend the Aluminum Extrusions antidumping and countervailing duty orders to cover imports of Chinese curtain wall/sides of buildings has been appealed to the Court of International Trade.  See the attached complaint.  Complaint and Aluminum Extrusion and Curtain Wall (2)

WOODFLOORING REVIEW INVESTIGATION STARTS UP

The US wood flooring industry has requested an antidumping and countervailing duty review investigation of numerous Chinese exporters.  If anyone wants a list of the Chinese companies named in the letter, please feel free to contact me.

CHINESE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTY ON PULP FROM THE US, CANADA AND BRAZIL

Possibly in response to the numerous US cases against Chinese wood products, we have learned that the Chinese government is on the verge of initiating a major antidumping case against imports of wood pulp, cotton pulp, and bamboo pulp from the US, Canada and Brazil.  If anyone wants a copy of the target companies in the US, Canada or Brazil, please feel free to contact me.

CUSTOMS—NEW TARIFF BILL

On January 1, 2013, The House of Representatives introduced this week a major tariff reduction bill, The U.S. Job Creation and Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2013.  Attached is a copy of the bill, which must still go to the Senate.  TARIFF BILL  The bill represents a bipartisan effort to lower costs for US manufacturers by lowering tariff rates to zero on hundreds of products, including numerous chemical products.  Since both Republicans and Democrats sponsor the bill, it will pass the House.  According to the attached announcement by the House Ways and Means Committee, the Senate Finance Committee has reviewed the same proposals in the House Bill so this bill should eventually pass the Senate and go to the President for his signature.  HOUSE ANNOUNCEMENT

 NEW 337 PATENT CASE AGAINST HUAWEI AND ZTE

On January 2, 2013, a new 337 patent case was filed at the International Trade Commission against Huawei and ZTE.  See notice below.

Docket No: 2929 

Document Type: 337 Complaint

Filed By: Bert C. Reiser

Firm/Org: Latham and Watkins

Behalf Of: Inter Digital Communications, Inc., Inter Digital Technology Corporation, IPR
Licensing, Inc. and Inter Digital Holdings, Inc.

Date Received: January 2, 2013

Commodity: Wireless Devices with 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components

Description: Letter to Lisa R. Barton, Acting Secretary, USITC; requesting that the Commission conduct an investigation under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended regarding Certain Wireless Devices with 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components Thereof . The proposed respondents are Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Korea; Samsung Electronics America, Inc., Ridgefield Park, NJ; Samsung Telecommunications America, LLC, Richardson, TX; Nokia Corporation, Finland; Nokia Inc., White Plains, NY; ZTE Corporation, China; ZTE (USA) Inc., Richardson, TX; Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd., China; Huawei Device USA, Inc., Plano, TX; and Future Wei Technologies, Inc., d/b/a Huawei Technologies (USA), Plano, TX.

Status: Pending Institution

If anyone wants a copy of the complaint, please feel free to contact me.

MORE PATENT CASES AGAINST HUAWEI AND ZTE

Attached are the companion complaints filed in Federal District Court by Interdigital against Huawei and ZTE.  INTERDIGITAL HUAWEI INTERDIGITAL ZTE

In addition, Steelhead Licensing has filed a new patent case against ZTE.  See attached complaint.  STEELHEAD ZTE 

 DRYWALL PRODUCTS LIABILITY LEGISLATION

On Tuesday, January 1, 2013, the House of Representatives passed legislation banning the sale of contaminated drywall imported from China.  In the bill, Congress insisted that the Chinese government force Chinese manufacturers to compensate American homeowners who have faced property damage and health problems caused by the tainted product.

The U.S. House of Representatives voted 378-37 in favor of the Drywall Safety Act.  On December 21, 2012, the same bill went through the US Senate on a unanimous, 100 to 0, vote so the bill is on President Obama’s desk for signature.

The bill stipulates that contaminated drywall be treated as a banned hazardous substance under the Federal Hazardous Substances Act and as an imminent hazard under the Consumer Product Safety Act. 

Attached is a copy of the bill going to the President for signature.  US LEGISLATION

Section 2 of the Bill reads as follows:

SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

“It is the sense of Congress that—

(1)  the Secretary of Commerce should insist that the Government of the People’s Republic of China, which has ownership interests in the companies that manufactured and exported problematic drywall to the United States, facilitate a meeting between the companies and representatives of the United States Government on remedying home owners that have problematic drywall in their homes;

and

(2)  the Secretary of Commerce should insist that the Government of the People’s Republic of China direct the companies that manufactured and exported problematic drywall to submit to jurisdiction in United States Federal Courts and comply with any decisions issued by the Courts for home owners with problematic drywall.”

As mentioned in a previous post on this blog, there is a major multidistrict litigation, which includes 10,000 or more cases ongoing in the Eastern District of Louisiana.  Recently, in September, the Court rejected an effort by a Chinese company to lift a default judgment in the case and the Court found jurisdiction over the Chinese company.

One Chinese drywall manufacturer Knauf Plasterboard Tianjin Co., a subsidiary of a German company, in December 2011 settled the personal injury and other claims in a settlement worth between $800 million and $1 billion. This settlement covers about 4,500 homes.

ENFORCEMENT OF ARBITRATION AWARD BY CHINESE COMPANY AGAINST US COMPANY

Attached is a complaint filed January 2, 2013 by Chongqing Hengsheng Xintai Trade Co., Ltd. against Baja, Inc. a/k/a Baja Motorsports, LLC, a Delaware Corp., in the US District Court of South Carolina seeking to enforce an arbitration award from the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (“CIETAC”) against a US company.  CHONGQING CIETAC AWARD COMPLAINT

If anyone wants any information about these complaints, developments or general information on US Trade, Customs, antitrust, securities, products liability or arbitration law, please feel free to contact me. 

Best regards,

Bill Perry

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